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Stop Incest Now

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Incest is defined as sexual relations of any kind perpetrated by a biologically or non-biologically related person functioning in the role of a family member.

One out of four females is sexually abused by the time she reaches tIhe age of 18.  About 75 percent of the perpetrators are family members. 

It  is real and not uncommon. . Children of every race, religion and economic status are abused and victims of incest.. The effects of incest don't stop when the abuse stops. There are often maybe long term effects of incest which follow the victim throughout his or her life. Some efffects are  lack of confidence, self destruction, self hatred, alcoholism, drug addiction, depression, eating disorders, the inability to trust and suicide .

Children often are forced into silence 

Many times a child does not disclose the abuse.  Prehaps the child does not feel he or she can.  Prehaps the child is in fear for him or her self or another family member or even a pet.  It is known that children are often threatened.  A child might fear the loss of love if it is known.  The child might think it is normal or his or her duty. We don't know all the reasons but we do know that to disclose abuse is very difficult and for a child to disclose sexual abuse extremely difficult.  Many times a small child does not even know what was really done.   Tthe child might don't want to cause problems.  the other parent might have even told the child to be quiet.

When a child does find the courage to speak up or a young child unknowingly says something which alarms the other parent and a report is made, the child is often considered to be inaccurate, a liar or just too young to be able to testify.  The abuser denies it and the case is dropped.  When the parents are separated, the child might end up in the custody of the molesting parent  .It is important for a disclosure to be heard respectfully and to be believed. To be victimized and than not believe is devastating and never more devastating than a rape victim reporting a rape or multiple rapes and than being forced by the court to live with the rapist unsupervise and to have the one supportive and loving person forcibly removed from contacting the victim is beyond belief.  Yes, beyond belief but not so. 

It happens all over the USA today in court room around our country.  Our country with inalienable rights of the citizens.  I ask,  is a child not a citizen?  Is a child not a person?  Is a child not important?

 

Sexual abuse includes:

sexual touching and fondling
exposing children to adult sexual activity, including pornographic movies and photographs
having children pose, undress or perform in a sexual fashion on film or in person
"peeping" into bathrooms or bedrooms to spy on a child
rape or attempted rape

. The abuse often begins gradually and increases over time.

The use of physical force is rarely necessary to engage a child in sexual activity because children are trusting and dependent. They want to please others and gain love and approval. Children are taught not to question authority and they believe that adults are always right. Perpetrators of child sexual abuse know this and take advantage of these vulnerabilities in children. Sexual abuse is an abuse of power over a child and a violation of a child's right to normal, healthy, trusting relationships.

Signs of Sexual Abuse 
 
Depression
Eating Disorders
Sleep disturbances
Nightmares
Physical complaints
School problems
Withdrawal from family, friends, or usual activities
Excessive bathing or poor hygiene
Anxiety
Running away
Passive or overly pleasing behavior
Low self-esteem
Self-destructive behavior
Anger
Drug or alcohol problems
Sexual activity or pregnancy at an early age; promiscuity
Suicide attempts

Characteristics and behavioral indicators of adults who molest children

When most people imagine a child molester, they picture some ugly, old man in a trench coat

coaxing children to come to him in exchange for some candy. They don't picture Uncle Joe or

Aunt Lorraine, the neighbor next door, the friendly parishioner, another family member, or

trusted co-worker. They don't think of mom or dad, or in the case of single parents their

significant other. This misconception has been effectively dispelled through information

obtained in thousands of child sexual abuse investigations over the years. Child molesters come

from all walks of life and from all socioeconomic groups. They can be male or female, rich or

poor, employed or unemployed, religious or non-religious or from any race. Children can be

molested by persons they don't know, relatives, friends or caregivers.

Both men and women molest children, although the majority of those identified, and prosecuted

for a sex offense, are men. Adults who molest children can generally be divided into two groups,

according to their behaviors. A small percentage may suffer from a lifelong exclusive attraction

to children and have little or no emotional interest in adult partners. The majority are not

exclusively attracted to children, have adult emotional relationships, and have not molested

multiple child victims. Also, adults who molest children of their same gender (i.e. an adult male

who molests a boy) are not necessarily homosexual.

The widespread misconception that child molestation consists solely of children being seized

from the street and forcibly molested couldn't be further from the truth. Although these incidents

do occur, the vast majority of child molesters are adults who seduce children through subtle

intimidation and persuasion and are known to the child.

The child molester who is not known by the victim may use a variety of methods to gain access

or to gain the confidence of the victim. He may use force, fear, bribery or tricks. He may pretend

or appear to be friendly and trustworthy. Often he gains access to children in public places, such

as playgrounds, parks or shopping malls.

Through the experience of law enforcement investigators, treatment providers, and research,

some common behavioral indicators have been identified and are described below.

Behavioral Indicators of Men or Women Who Have Molested Children

CAUTION: Some people who have molested, or plan to molest, a child exhibit

no observable behavior pattern that would be a clue to their future actions.

1. Most often an adult male, however, adolescents and women also molest children.

2. Is usually married. A small number never marry and maintain a lifelong sexual and

emotional interest in children.

3. May relate better to children than adults and may feel more comfortable with children

and their interests.

4. May have few close adult friends.

5. Usually prefers children in a specific age group.

6. Usually prefers one gender over the other, however, some are bisexual in their

preference.

7. May seek employment or volunteer opportunities with programs involving children in the

preferred victim age group for this type of offender.

8. Pursues children for sexual purposes and may feel emotionally attached to the extent that

emotional needs are met by engaging in relationships with children. Example: An adult

man spends time with neighbor children or relatives and talks at length about his feelings

for them or his own feelings of loneliness or loss in order to get the child's sympathy.

9. Photographs or collects photographs of their victims, dressed, nude or involved in sexual

acts.

10. May collect child erotica and child-adult pornography which may be used in the

following ways:

Some people who have molested, or plan to molest, a child exhibit

no observable behavior pattern that would be a clue to their future actions.

1. Most often an adult male, however, adolescents and women also molest children.

2. Is usually married. A small number never marry and maintain a lifelong sexual and

emotional interest in children.

3. May relate better to children than adults and may feel more comfortable with children

and their interests.

4. May have few close adult friends.

5. Usually prefers children in a specific age group.

6. Usually prefers one gender over the other, however, some are bisexual in their

preference.

7. May seek employment or volunteer opportunities with programs involving children in the

preferred victim age group for this type of offender.

8. Pursues children for sexual purposes and may feel emotionally attached to the extent that

emotional needs are met by engaging in relationships with children. Example: An adult

man spends time with neighbor children or relatives and talks at length about his feelings

for them or his own feelings of loneliness or loss in order to get the child's sympathy.

9. Photographs or collects photographs of their victims, dressed, nude or involved in sexual

acts.

10. May collect child erotica and child-adult pornography which may be used in the

following ways:

To lower the inhibitions of victims.

To lower the inhibitions of victims.

To fantasize when no potential victim is available.

To fantasize when no potential victim is available.

To relive past sexual activities.

To relive past sexual activities.

To justify their inappropriate sexual activities.

To justify their inappropriate sexual activities.

To blackmail victims to keep them from telling.

11. May possess alcohol or narcotics and furnish them to their victims to lower inhibitions or

gain favor.

12. Talks with children in ways that equalize their relationship.

13. May talk about children in the same manner as one would talk about an adult lover or

partner.

14. May seek out organizations (such as National Association of Men-Boy Love/NAMBLA)

and publications that support his sexual beliefs and practices.

15. May offer to baby-sit or take children on trips in order to manipulate situations to sleep

with or near children or bathe or dress them.

16. May be seen at parks, playgrounds or places frequented by children or teenagers.

To blackmail victims to keep them from telling.

11. May possess alcohol or narcotics and furnish them to their victims to lower inhibitions or

gain favor.

12. Talks with children in ways that equalize their relationship.

13. May talk about children in the same manner as one would talk about an adult lover or

partner.

14. May seek out organizations (such as National Association of Men-Boy Love/NAMBLA)

and publications that support his sexual beliefs and practices.

15. May offer to baby-sit or take children on trips in order to manipulate situations to sleep

with or near children or bathe or dress them.

16. May be seen at parks, playgrounds or places frequented by children or teenagers.

Intrafamilial Child Abuse

The incestuous or intrafamilial molester is usually an adult male (father, stepfather, grandfather

or live-in boyfriend of the mother), however, mothers or other female caregivers also sexually

abuse children. The molestation is usually secretive and is sometimes accomplished through

misuse of power, mental duress, bribes, tricks or misuse of parental role under the guise of sex

education and threats.

Common threats may include: that the child would be removed from the family if they do not

succumb to the offender’s wishes; that they would be blamed for hurting the family if the

offender is arrested; that a sibling would be sexually abused if the victim does not consent. Often

the offender will portray act needy or emotionally distraught as a result of marital problems,

thereby needing the attention of the victim.

The molestation usually occurs over an extended period of time, occasionally into the victim's

adulthood. Through intimidation, the child is made to feel responsible for the molestation and for

keeping the acts secret. This secret is normally kept between the offender and the victim, or

within the immediate family.

There are many situations where a family with children can be vulnerable, such as single parent

families where the parent has a full time job and is attempting to fulfill the role of both parents as

well as run the household or in situations where family conflicts leave a child feeling alienated or

abandoned. Some male offenders seek out mothers who are single parents for the purpose of

victimizing their children. In these cases, he may have a genuine attraction to the mother and the

hidden agenda of pursuit of the children as victims.

Children from all types of families can be vulnerable to child molesters. Any child whose needs

for attention or affection are not being met can be particularly vulnerable. It is important to

remember, however, that because adults have power over children, any child can be at risk.

Talking to Your Children

Because offenders get their power through secrecy the single most effective means of protecting

your child is communication with your child. They have to feel comfortable discussing sensitive

matters with you. If they feel they can talk with you about their true feelings and that they will be

not 'put down' for it, then they will be more likely to tell you when they are put in an

uncomfortable situation by a child molester. Also, children need to know that there are many

adults who can help if they have a problem.

This and other safety information is available from the following organizations. Please share this

information with your family and friends.

Jacob Wetterling Foundation www.jwf.org 1-800-325-HOPE

www.jwf.org 1-800-325-HOPE

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children www.missingkids.com 1-800-THE-LOST

www.missingkids.com 1-800-THE-LOST

Stop It Now! Minnesota www.stopitnow.com/mn 651-644-8515

stopitnowmn@projectpathfinder.org

www.stopitnow.com/mn 651-644-8515

stopitnowmn@projectpathfinder.org

Baptist on Incest

Sin and the sanctity of human life

In Leviticus 18, God clearly states his hatred of incest. He points out that incestuous relationships typified the degradation of the societies God was driving out before the Israelites and actually defiled the very land they lived in. Israelites who practiced incest were to be cut off from their people. The Apostle Paul in his letter to a New Testament church (1 Corinthians 5) presents a parallel idea. The brother involved in an incestuous affair was to be handed over to Satan - cut off from the church until he truly repented.

According to the same Mosaic law, the raping of a married or engaged woman was punishable by death. (God does not, however condemn the woman who is truly innocent - the one who cries out to no avail, Deuteronomy 22:23-27.) If an unmarried woman was raped, the man was to marry her and provide for her as long as he lived (Deut. 22:28-29).

Clearly, God detests rape and incest, as well as any other form of sexual immorality. Yet nowhere does He condemn the offspring of sexual immorality.4 Rather, they are the recipients of blessing. Moab and Ben-ammi, the sons of Lot and his daughters, grew into mighty nations. Perez, the son of Judah and his daughter-in-law, stands in the blessing on Ruth and in the genealogy of Christ. In fact, God stresses the principle that "Fathers shall not be put to death for their children, nor children put to death for their fathers; each is to die for his own sin" (Deut. 24:16).


Catholics on Incest
 

Incest

(Latin in, not, and castus, chaste).

Incest is sexual intercourse between those who are related by blood or marriage.

Its specific malice is contracted by such unlawful commerce between those related within the fourth degree of consanguinity or affinity, as computed by canonists. The guilt is incurred not only by those sinful acts which are, as theologians say, fully consummated, but also by incomplete acts.

The particular deformity of incest comes not merely from the violation of the virtue of chastity, but also from the offence against the mingled affection and reverence with which parents and, proportionately, other relatives should be regarded.

It is certain that this crime has its distinctive enormity from the prohibition of the natural law, where there is question of the first degree in the direct line, for instance, between parents and children. For the other degrees it is probable that recourse must be had to the ecclesiastical law which invalidates marriage within those limits.

It is commonly held, with regard to those related by consanguinity or affinity, that with the exception of the first degree in the direct line all forms of incest are, morally speaking, of the same species, and therefore for the integrity of confession there is no necessity to distinguish between them. It must be noted, however, that carnal sins between those who are spiritually or legally related within the degrees that would render their marriage invalid, are separate species of incest.

A decree of the Holy Office, 25 June, 1885, declares that in applications for matrimonial dispensations it is no longer necessary to make mention of the circumstance of incest relations between the petitioners.

 

Jewish Views Incest

The Awareness Center, Inc.

Common Symptoms of Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

© (1994) Victoria Polin, MA, ATR, LCPC and Gail Roy, MA, ATR, LCPC

1. Low self-esteem, feeling worthless.

2. Fear of abandonment and other abandonment issues.

3. Acting out behavior. Not knowing how to identify, process and or express intense feelings in more productive ways.

4. Unexplained fears of being alone at night, nightmares and/or night terrors. . .

5. Feeling overly grateful/appreciative from small favors by others.

6. Boundary issues: lack of, needing to be in control, power issues, fear of losing control...

7. Eating disorders including: anorexia, bulimia, compulsive over-eating etc...

8. Headaches, arthritis and/or joint pain, gynecological disorders, stomach aches and other somatic symptomology.

9. Unexplained anxiety/panic, when with individuals from childhood.

10. Extreme guilt/shame.

11. Obsessive/compulsive behaviors (not necessarily Obsessive/Compulsive Disorder).

12. History of being involved in emotionally, psychological and/or physically violent relationships(emotionally,

physically).

13. Memories of domestic violence in childhood.

14. Sexual acting out, "sexaholism", history of prostitution, performing in porn films...

15. Distorted body image/poor body image.

16. Hypervigilance.

17. History of ambivalent or intensely conflictive relationships.

18. Depersonalization. Feeling oneself to be unreal and everyone else to be real (or vice versa).

19. Blocking out periods of one's life (usually ages 1-12) or a specific person or place.

20. History of multi-victimizations in other forms.

21. Extremely high or low risk taking.

22. Obsession with suicide at various times of the year or after triggering events.

23. Wearing layers of clothing, even in the summer - caused by body image issues.

24. Intense anxiety and/or avoidance of gynecological exams.

25. Unexplained fears of suffocation.

The Awareness Center is the Jewish Coalition Against Sexual Abuse/Assault (JCASA)

Rape & Incest: Islamic Perspective
Uzma Mazhar

Incest and rape are not new in this day and age; these problems have always existed and will continue to exist if not confronted face on.  If you have ever worked with an incest, sexual abuse or rape survivor you will never be able to forget the devastating impact it has on all aspects of their life, nor will you be able to sit back and do nothing about this issue.  These are serious crimes that corrode the fabric of family and society and cannot go un-addressed, since these problems do exist in Muslim families it is about time that we address it openly and take action to put an end to it. 

To fully understand this issue we need to examine what Islām teaches us about the value of human life

Islām views human life as a sacred gift from God. The Qur’ān repeatedly stresses the sanctity of life (hurmat al hayat). The life of every single individual regardless of gender, age, nationality or religion is worthy of respect.  In verses referring to the sanctity of life, the term used is ‘nafs’ (soul, life); and there is no distinction made in that soul being young or old, male or female, Muslim or non-muslim. 

Sūrah al An'am 6.151:
"Do not take any human being's life, (the life) which God has declared to be sacred - otherwise than in (the pursuit of) justice: this has He enjoined upon you so that you might use your reason."
(Also check: Sūrah al Isra 17.33 & Sūrah al Ma'idah 5.32

Qur’ānic teachings encompass every aspect of life; hence it does not limit the definition of life to the physical body only, but includes the mental, emotional and spiritual aspects as well.  There are about 150 verses that define the term ‘nafs’ in various ways making it clear that the concept of ‘life’ is not limited to mere physical existence

Historically, Islam has addressed serious issues openly and sought to correct actions that constitute harm or ‘zulm’ (ie: cruelty and abuse) to the dignity of humankind.  Human life and respect for it has been stressed unstintingly, regardless of age or gender.  As a general rule, Islām forbids all ‘zulm’, be it physical, mental, emotional or spiritual

Sūrah al An'am 6.120
”Abandon all harm (ithm), whether committed openly or in secret.” 
(Check Sūrah al A`raf 7:33)

Sūrah al 49:11-12 points out categorically that emotionally abusive language and behavior is not acceptable.
"You who believe do not let one (set of) people make fun of another set. Do not defame one another. Do not insult by using nicknames. And do not backbite or speak ill of one another."

In the last address to his community, the Prophet (saw) said: "Your lives and properties are forbidden to one another till you meet your Lord on the Day of Resurrection… Regard the life and property of every Muslim as a sacred trust… Hurt no one so that no one may hurt you... You will neither inflict nor suffer any inequity."  The Prophet (saw) did not prohibit only the unlawful encroachment of one another’s life and property, but also honor and respect. 

Considering that human life is to be valued and cruelty is forbidden, what is the Islamic perspective on incest and rape?

According to Islām, a woman has to be respected and protected under all circumstances, whether she belongs to your own nation or to the nation of an enemy, whether she follows your religion or belongs to some other religion or has no religion at all.  A Muslim cannot outrage her under any circumstances.  All promiscuous relationships have been forbidden to him, irrespective of the status or position of the woman, whether the woman is a willing or an unwilling partner to the act. The words of the Holy Qur’ān in this respect are: "Do not approach (the bounds of) adultery" (17:32). Heavy punishment has been prescribed for this crime, and the order has not been qualified by any conditions. Since the violation of chastity of a woman is forbidden in Islam, a Muslim who perpetrates this crime cannot escape punishment. (Maudoodi)

The Quran has, in various ways and in different contexts; impressed on men that they must observe the limits set by God (Hudūd Allah) in respect to women and must not encroach upon their rights in either marriage or divorce. In all situations it is the men who are reminded, corrected and reprimanded, over and over again, to be generous to women and to be kind, compassionate, fair and just in their dealings with women.  Even in divorce, when the chances of anger and vindictiveness are high, it is stressed that men are to separate with grace, equity and generosity and women is apparent from rulings against female infanticide and rights of inheritance given even to an unborn child; and the kindness mandated even when divorcing your wife.  There are numerous ahādīth about the rights of children to respect and dignity.  The same holds true for respect and the unprecedented rights given to women.   

Relevant verses from the Quran:
Sūrah an Nās 4.119
'O you who believe! You are forbidden to inherit women against their will...'

Sūrah an Nūr 24.33
'... And do not, in order to gain some of the fleeting pleasures of this worldly life, coerce your slave women into whoredom if they are desirous of marriage, and if anyone should coerce them, then, verily, after they have been compelled (to submit in their helplessness), God will be much forgiving, a dispenser of grace (to them).

During the time of the Prophet (saw) punishment was inflicted on the rapist on the solitary evidence of the woman who was raped by him.  Wa'il ibn Hujr reports of an incident when a woman was raped.  Later, when some people came by, she identified and accused the man of raping her.  They seized him and brought him to Allah's messenger, who said to the woman, "Go away, for Allāh has forgiven you," but of the man who had raped her, he said, "Stone him to death." (Tirmidhi and Abu Dawud)

During the time when Umar (raa) was the Khalifah, a woman accused his son Abu Shahmah of raping her; she brought the infant borne of this incident with her to the mosque and publicly spoke about what had happened.  Umar (raa) asked his son who acknowledged committing the crime and was duly punished right there and then.  There was no punishment given to the woman. Islamic legal scholars interpret rape as a crime in the category of Hiraba.  In ‘Fiqh-us-Sunnah’, hiraba is described as: ‘a single person or group of people causing public disruption, killing, forcibly taking property or money, attacking or raping women (hatk al ‘arad), killing cattle, or disrupting agriculture.

The famous jurist, Ibn Hazm, had the widest definition of hiraba, defining a hiraba offender as: ‘One who puts people in fear on the road, whether or not with a weapon, at night or day, in urban areas or in open spaces, in the palace of a caliph or a mosque, with or without accomplices, in the desert or in the village, in a large or small city, with one or more people… making people fear that they’ll be killed, or have money taken, or be raped (hatk al ‘arad)… whether the attackers are one or manyAl-Dasuqi held that if a person forced a woman to have sex, his actions would be deemed as committing hiraba. In addition, the Maliki judge Ibn ‘Arabi, relates a story in which a group was attacked and a woman in their party was raped.  Responding to the argument that the crime did not constitute hiraba because no money was taken and no weapons used, Ibn ‘Arabi replied indignantly that "hiraba with the private parts" is much worse than hiraba involving the taking of money, and that anyone would rather be subjected to the latter than the former

The crime of rape is classified not as a subcategory of ‘zina’ (consensual adultery), but rather as a separate crime of violence under hiraba. This classification is logical, as the "taking" is of the victim’s property (the rape victim’s sexual autonomy) by force. In Islam, sexual autonomy and pleasure is a fundamental right for both women and men (Ghazālī); taking by force someone’s right to control the sexual activity of one’s body is thus a form of hiraba. 

Rape as hiraba is a violent crime that uses sexual intercourse as a weapon. The focus in a hiraba prosecution is the accused rapist and his intent and physical actions, and not second-guessing the consent of the rape victim.  Hiraba does not require four witnesses to prove the offense, circumstantial evidence, medical data and expert testimony form the evidence used to prosecute such crimes.

Islamic legal responses to rape are not limited to a criminal prosecution for hiraba. Islamic jurisprudence also provides an avenue for civil redress for a rape survivor in its law of "jirah" (wounds). Islamic law designates ownership rights to each part of one’s body, and a right to corresponding compensation for any harm done unlawfully to any of those parts. Islamic law calls this the ‘law of jirah’ (wounds). Harm to a sexual organ, therefore, entitles the person harmed to appropriate financial compensation under classical Islamic jirah jurisprudence.  Each school of Islamic law has held that where a woman is harmed through sexual intercourse (some include marital intercourse), she is entitled to financial compensation for the harm. Further, where this intercourse was without the consent of the woman, the perpetrator must pay the woman both the basic compensation for the harm, as well as an additional amount based on the ‘diyya’ (financial compensation for murder, akin to a wrongful death payment).

Islamic law, with its radical introduction of a woman’s right to own property as a fundamental right, employs a gender-egalitarian attitude in this area of jurisprudence. In fact, there is a hadith specifically directed to transforming the early Muslim population out of this patriarchal attitude of male financial compensation for female sexual activity. During the time of Prophet Muhammad, a young man committed zina with his employer’s wife. The father of the young man gave one hundred goats and a maid as compensation to the employer, who accepted it. When the case was reported to the Prophet, he ordered the return of the goats and the maid to the young man’s father and prosecuted the adulterer for zina (Abu Daud 1990, 3: Bk. 33, No. 4430; Bukhāri 1985, 8:Bk. 81, Nos. 815, 821, 826).

Early Islam thus established that there should be no tolerance of the attitude that a woman’s sexual activity is something to be bartered, pawned, gossiped about, or owned by the men in her life. Personal responsibility of every human being for their own actions is a fundamental principle in Islamic thought.

Marital Rape
The Quran is very clear that the basis of a marital relationship is love and affection between the spouses, not power or control.  Rape is unacceptable in such a relationship.

Sūrah al Baqarah 2.223
'Your wives are your tilth; go then unto your tilth as you may desire, but first provide something for your souls*, and remain conscious of God, and know that your are destined to meet Him...'
* Note in Muhammad Asad's translation: 'a spiritual relationship between man and woman is postulated as the indispensable basis of sexual relations.'

Sūrah ar Rum 30.21
"And among His wonders is this: He creates for you mates out of your own kind, so that your might incline towards then, and He engenders love and tenderness between you: in this, behold, there are messages indeed for people who think!

Sūrah al Baqarah 2.187
"... They are as a garment for you, and you are as a garment for them."

Sūrah al Nisa 4.19
"... And consort with your wives in a goodly manner, for if you dislike them, it may well be that you dislike something which God might yet make a source of abundant good."

"Is there recognition of marital rape in Islam?
In the context of jirah, it would appear so: where there is any physical harm or disease caused to a spouse, there may be a claim for jirah compensation. The law of jirah provides for compensation for physical harm between spouses, and supports Islamic legislation against domestic abuse.  Even in these discussions of appropriate jirah compensation, the question of the injured party’s consent plays a central role.  Some Islamic jurists considered consent to be presumed by virtue of the marital relationship, while others maintain that where harm occurs, it is an assault, regardless of the consent, and therefore compensation is due. In our modern era, one might take these precedents and their premium focus on consent and apply the Islamic principle of sexual autonomy to conclude that any sex without consent is harmful, as a dishonoring of the unwilling party’s sexual autonomy. Thus, modern Islamic jurists and legislators, taking a gender-egalitarian perspective, might conclude that Islamic law does recognize marital rape, and assign the appropriate injunctions and compensation for this personally devastating harm." (Qureshi)

An often misquoted and abused hadith that is used to tyrannize women is that women cannot and should not say no to their husband when he approaches them  Women are advised not to turn away from their husbands except if they have their period or any other reasonable excuse.  So much so that she is to break her voluntary fast if her husband approaches her.  And if they do angels will curse them.  However, this hadith is not quoted with the complementary one that advises men of the same consideration.

In the same manner men are advised that meeting the needs of their wives takes precedence over voluntary worship.  Narrated Abdullah bin Amr bin Al-As: "Prophet Muhammad (saw) said, “O Abdullah! I have been informed that you fast all the day and stand in prayer all night?” I said, ‘Yes, O Allah's Apostle!’ He said, “Do not do that! Observe the fast sometimes and also leave them at other times, stand up for the prayer at night and also sleep at night. Your body has a right over you and your wife has a right over you.” (Bukhāri)

To a certain degree these ahādīth are used to confuse and distract from the issue, since rape does not have anything to do with permission or lack of permission.  In a marriage abusive or forced sexual activity cannot be justified by abusing this hadith.  Rape is defined as unwanted, violent and forced sex, whether this occurs in a marital context or outside it.  The definition of rape does not change because of the relationship.

It is important to not confuse the issue of mutual rights that a couple has on each other with the misguided, distorted and misogynist assumption that women become a husband's property.  Islam does not allow for or tolerate ownership of human beings.  Human dignity does not allow that any one person has the right to own, mind/body/soul, another human being... and Islam demands that all human beings respect the humanity of everyone.

Incest & Child Abuse
The Quran clearly outlines those with whom marriage is not permitted, we can extrapolate from it that any sexual relation with these would be unacceptable.  

Sūrah an Nisa 4:23: 
Prohibited for you (in marriage) are your mothers, your daughters, your sisters, the sisters of your fathers, the sisters of your mothers, the daughters of your brother, the daughters of your sister, your nursing mothers, the girls who nursed from the same woman as you, the mothers of your wives, the daughters of your wives with whom you have consummated the marriage - if the marriage has not been consummated, you may marry the daughter. Also prohibited for you are the women who were married to your genetic sons. Also, you shall not be married to two sisters at the same time - but do not break up existing marriages. GOD is Forgiver, Most Merciful.

This includes your foster parents, siblings and children.

Al Hasan reports: ‘If somebody commits illegal intercourse with his sister, his punishment is the same as for any other person who commits such a crime’. (Bukhāri Vol. 8 pp 526)

Thus, these same laws mentioned above in cases of rape would be equally applicable, and incest can be prosecuted as a crime within the bounds of Islamic law.  

According to Islam, all aspects of life, ie: the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual, are sacred and must be respected.  No gender or relationship has been given the power or right to hurt or harm the other. Domestic violence, rape and incest are all violent and criminal abuses that are outside the bounds of what is permitted in Islam and there is absolutely no justification for it whatsoever.  

 

References:
-Ghazālī; “Ihya Ulum ud Din”
-Hasan, Riffat; “Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective: Religious Perspectives” John Witte, Jr. and  Johan D. van der Vyver Eds. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1996
-Maudoodi, Abu al Ala; “Human Rights in Islam”
The Islamic Foundation  UK 1976, 1993
-Qureshi, Asifa LLM;  “Her Honor: An Islamic Critique of the Rape Laws of Pakistan from a Woman-Sensitive Perspective”
-Rahman, Afzal ur; "Role of Muslim Women in Society"  Seerah Foundation, London, 1986
-Rauf, Muhammad Abdul;  “Umar al Faruq”  Al Saadawi Publications, 1998

Abridged version of article published in the September issue of 'Islāmic Reflections 2002'

Contact Info: UzmaMazhar@hotmail.com

 

Let Us ABHOR What Is Wicked

Jehovah Winess on Sexual Abuse
   
Related topics:
Comfort for Those With a "Stricken Spirit"
Protect Your Children!
Child MolestingYou Can Protect Your Child
 

JEHOVAH is a holy God. In ancient times he was "the Holy One of Israel," and as such he demanded that Israel be clean, unsullied. (Psalm 89:18) He told his chosen people: "You must prove yourselves holy, because I am holy." (Leviticus 11:45) Anyone who wanted to "ascend into the mountain of Jehovah" had to be "innocent in his hands and clean in heart." (Psalm 24:3, 4) That meant more than merely avoiding sinful acts. It meant "the hating of bad."—Proverbs 8:13.

Lovingly, Jehovah laid down detailed laws so that the nation of Israel could identify and avoid wrongdoing. (Romans 7:7, 12) These laws included strict guidelines on morality. Adultery, homosexual acts, incestuous relationships, and bestiality were all identified as unholy spiritual pollutants. (Leviticus 18:23; 20:10-17) Those guilty of such degraded acts were cut off from the nation of Israel.

For complete article please visit  http://www.watchtower.org/

Warren Farrell vs Liz Notes on Incest

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 Betrayal of Trust: Child Sexual Abuse Loopholes in American  Law as posted on Protect.Org
 July, 2006

"Many state codes create a foul distinction between child sexual assaults... These state laws consider incest to be a less serious form of sexual assault."
Gregory Weber, Assistant Attorney General, Wisconsin

Since our founding in 2002, PROTECT has fought for equal protection for all children. From Arkansas to Illinois and California to New York, we have worked to close outrageous legal loopholes that provide lighter penalties for criminals who sexually assault their own children. PROTECT members frequently ask which states have these child sexual abuse loopholes. Identifying them all--and keeping up to date with legislative changes--is a massive research undertaking. But thanks to volunteers across the U.S. and in London, we've made a start.

The information below is just a sampling of known loopholes. We hope that it will help you understand the various ways the law betrays young crime victims. Existing loopholes range from antiquated incest laws--which can be used to plea bargain (or charge bargain) child rape to minor penalties--to more intentional statutes, such as the Hawaii law that not only gives preferential treatment to incest perpetrators, it requires police to tell them they're special. PROTECT's Circle of Trust campaign will continue to fight on, demanding that every child be protected from betrayal at the hands of predators... and the law.


Incest Loopholes
The most common type of child sexual abuse loophole is the incest exception or incest loophole. Typically, these antiquated statutes were intended to prevent intermarriage among closely-related adults and were not designed to address child sexual abuse. However, the vast majority of incest crimes are crimes against children. Incest loopholes create two separate standards of justice, and allow child rape within the family to be prosecuted as a minor crime.

Delaware
766 Incest; class A misdemeanor
(a) A person is guilty of incest if the person engages in sexual intercourse with another person with whom the person has one of the following relationships:
A male and his child...
A male and his grandchild.
[etc...]
(b) The relationships referred to herein include blood relationships without regard to legitimacy and relationships by adoption.
Incest is a class A misdemeanor and is an offense within the original jurisdiction of the Family Court.


Family Preservation Loopholes
A more modern type of differential treatment of child sexual abuse in the home is often not really a loophole at all. Some states have intentionally codified pervasive and deeply-entrenched attitudes that minimize child sexual abuse in families, leaving many young victims without equal protection under the law. California, prior to PROTECT's landmark 2005 Circle of Trust victory, was the most prominent such scheme. Criminals who raped children in their own home were eligible for probation instead of prison, but only if they entered a "recognized program of treatment." The only programs recognized by California were those treating the entire "family." Thus the laws fueled and worked in tandem with a massive sex offender treatment industry to reunify perpetrators with their victims. The sex offender treatment industry often plays a role in drafting these laws (see Utah, below), and defends them by claiming that keeping sexual predators in the home with children--after a period of treatment, of course--is in the child's "best interest." Here are some examples of family reunification loopholes:

Minnesota
609.342 Criminal sexual conduct in the first degree.
Subdivision 1. Crime defined. A person who engages in sexual penetration with another person, or in sexual contact with a person under 13 years of age as defined in section 609.341, subdivision 11, paragraph (c), is guilty of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree
[...]
Subd. 2. Penalty. (a) Except as otherwise provided in section 609.109 or 609.3455, a person convicted under subdivision 1 may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than 30 years or to a payment of a fine of not more than $40,000, or both.
[...]
Subd. 3. Stay. Except when imprisonment is required under section 609.109 or 609.3455, if a person is convicted under subdivision 1, clause (g), the court may stay imposition or execution of the sentence if it finds that:
(a) a stay is in the best interest of the complainant or the family unit; and
(b) a professional assessment indicates that the offender has been accepted by and can respond to a treatment program.
If the court stays imposition or execution of sentence, it shall include the following as conditions of probation:
(1) incarceration in a local jail or workhouse;
(2) a requirement that the offender complete a treatment program; and
(3) a requirement that the offender have no unsupervised contact with the complainant until the offender has successfully completed the treatment program unless approved by the treatment program and the supervising correctional agent.

Utah
76-5-406.5. Circumstances required for probation or suspension of sentence for certain sex offenses against a child.
(1) In a case involving a conviction for a violation of Section 76-5-402.1, rape of a child; Section 76-5-402.3, object rape of a child; Section 76-5-403.1, sodomy on a child; or any attempt to commit a felony under those sections or a conviction for a violation of Subsections 76-5-404.1(4) and (5), aggravated sexual abuse of a child, the court may suspend execution of sentence and consider probation to a residential sexual abuse treatment center only if all of the following circumstances are found by the court to be present and the court in its discretion, considering the circumstances of the offense, including the nature, frequency, and duration of the conduct, and considering the best interests of the public and the child victim, finds probation to a residential sexual abuse treatment center to be proper:
(a) the defendant did not use a weapon, force, violence, substantial duress or menace, or threat of harm, in committing the offense or before or after committing the offense, in an attempt to frighten the child victim or keep the child victim from reporting the offense;
(b) the defendant did not cause bodily injury to the child [...]
(c) the defendant, prior to the offense, had not been convicted of any public offense in Utah or elsewhere involving sexual misconduct in the commission of the offense;
(d) the defendant did not commit an offense described in this Part 4, Sexual Offenses, against more than one child victim or victim [...]
(e) the defendant did not use, show, or display pornography or create sexually-related photographs or tape recordings in the course of the offense;
(f) the defendant did not act in concert with another offender [...]
(g) the defendant did not encourage, aid, allow, or benefit from any act of prostitution or sexual act by the child victim with any other person or sexual performance by the child victim before any other person;
(h) the defendant admits the offense of which he has been convicted and has been accepted for mental health treatment in a residential sexual abuse treatment center that has been approved by the Department of Corrections under Subsection (3);
(i) rehabilitation of the defendant through treatment is probable, based upon evidence provided by a treatment professional who has been approved by the Department of Corrections under Subsection (3) and who has accepted the defendant for treatment;
(j) prior to being sentenced, the defendant has undergone a complete psychological evaluation conducted by a professional approved by the Department of Corrections and:
(i) the professional's opinion is that the defendant is not an exclusive pedophile and does not present an immediate and present danger to the community if released on probation and placed in a residential sexual abuse treatment center; and (ii) the court accepts the opinion of the professional;
(k) if the offense is committed by a parent, stepparent, adoptive parent, or legal guardian of the child victim, the defendant shall, in addition to establishing all other conditions of this section, establish it is in the child victim's best interest that the defendant not be imprisoned, by presenting evidence provided by a treatment professional who:
(i) is treating the child victim and understands he will be treating the family as a whole; or
(ii) has assessed the child victim for purposes of treatment as ordered by the court based on a showing of good cause; and
(l) if probation is imposed, the defendant, as a condition of probation, may not reside in a home where children younger than 18 years of age reside for at least one year beginning with the commencement of treatment, and may not again take up residency in a home where children younger than 18 years of age reside during the period of probation until allowed to do so by order of the court.
(2) A term of incarceration of at least 90 days is to be served prior to treatment and continue until the time when bed space is available at a residential sexual abuse treatment center as provided under Subsection (3) and probation is to be imposed for up to a maximum of ten years.
(3) (a) The Department of Corrections shall develop qualification criteria for the approval of the sexual abuse treatment programs and professionals under this section. The criteria shall include the screening criteria employed by the department for sexual offenders.
[...]


 
             

 
Diversion Loopholes
Most child sexual abuse cases, especially those within the family, never make it to criminal courtrooms at all. Crimes against children are rejected for prosecution or adjudication behind the scenes every day across America. In many states, laws on the books spell out the process for diverting child sexual abuse cases... especially those within the family. Often, diversion programs end with all charges being dropped or a conviction expunged from the record. Perhaps no diversion law is more extreme and bizarre than Hawaii's expedited sentencing program (below), which requires police to read incest suspects their special rights:

Hawaii
706-606.3 Expedited sentencing program [...]
(1) A person who has committed intra-family sexual assault may be considered for the expedited sentencing program in accordance with this section. As used in this section, "intra-family" sexual assault means any criminal offense of felony sexual assault under section 707-730, 707-731, or 707-732, or incest, as defined in section 707-741, in which the victim of the offense is related to the defendant by consanguinity or marriage, or resides in the same dwelling unit as the defendant, and the victim was, at the time of the sexual assault, under the age of eighteen.
(2) The police department of the county in which the sexual assault took place or any other appropriate investigative law enforcement agency shall confer with the appropriate prosecuting authority. If the prosecuting authority determines that it is appropriate to provide notice of the expedited sentencing program to the defendant, the police department or other appropriate investigative law enforcement agency shall give the defendant written notice of the existence of the expedited sentencing program provided in this section. The notice provision shall not be a prerequisite to questioning the defendant. The notice provision shall not obligate the prosecuting authority to issue a statement of "no objection" when considering the defendant for the expedited sentencing program.
(3) The written notice shall state:
"YOU ARE ADVISED TO SEEK LEGAL COUNSEL IMMEDIATELY. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD PRIVATE COUNSEL, CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC DEFENDER. FAILURE TO CONTACT AN ATTORNEY MAY DISQUALIFY YOU FROM THIS PROGRAM. A copy of section 706-606.3, Hawaii Revised Statutes, is attached to this notice. You are under investigation for a felony sexual assault against a minor. Upon completion of this investigation, if there is sufficient basis to believe that you have committed a sexual assault, the case will be referred to the appropriate prosecuting authority for review and possible institution of criminal charges. Hawaii law provides for a range of ordinary prison sentences for felony sexual assault ranging from five years up to twenty years, or life imprisonment, depending upon the offense. However, section 706-606.3, Hawaii Revised Statutes, provides that a person who commits a sexual assault upon a minor but who admits guilt, cooperates with the prosecuting authority, and participates in appropriate assessment and treatment may be considered for the expedited sentencing program. A person who is sentenced in accordance with the expedited sentencing program may be sentenced to a term of probation. Probation may be revoked, however, for failure to comply with the terms of the probation pursuant to section 706-625. To qualify for consideration for the expedited sentencing program, your legal counsel first must request from the office of the prosecuting authority named in this notice a written statement as to whether that office has any objection to your being considered for the expedited sentencing program. THE COURT WILL NOT CONSIDER YOU FOR THE EXPEDITED SENTENCING PROGRAM UNDER SECTION 706-606.3, HAWAII REVISED STATUTES, UNLESS YOUR LEGAL COUNSEL HAS RECEIVED A WRITTEN STATEMENT THAT THE APPROPRIATE PROSECUTING AUTHORITY HAS NO OBJECTION TO YOUR BEING CONSIDERED FOR THE EXPEDITED SENTENCING PROGRAM AND THE REQUEST FOR THAT WRITTEN STATEMENT WAS MADE WITHIN FOURTEEN DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. FURTHER, THE COURT WILL NOT CONSIDER YOU FOR THE EXPEDITED SENTENCING PROGRAM UNDER SECTION 706-606.3, HAWAII REVISED STATUTES, UNLESS, ONCE YOUR LEGAL COUNSEL HAS RECEIVED THIS NOTICE, YOU HAVE MADE A GOOD FAITH EFFORT TO AVOID THE NECESSITY OF THE CHILD BEING REMOVED FROM THE FAMILY HOME, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO MOVING AND REMAINING OUT OF THE FAMILY HOME UNTIL OTHERWISE ORDERED BY THE COURT."
The written notice also shall provide:
(a) Instructions on how to contact the appropriate prosecuting authority, including any necessary addresses and telephone numbers; and
(b) The name of the person delivering the notice and the date it was given to the alleged offender.
(4) A defendant shall not be considered by the court for the expedited sentencing program under this section unless the defendant's legal counsel requests within fourteen days of the defendant's receipt of the written notice, that the defendant be considered for the expedited sentencing program, and defendant's counsel subsequently receives a written statement from the appropriate prosecuting authority stating that it has no objection to the defendant being considered for the expedited sentencing program in accordance with this section. Additionally, each of the following criteria shall be met:
(a) After receiving the required written notice, the defendant made a good faith effort to avoid the necessity of the child being removed from the family home, including but not limited to moving and remaining out of the family home until otherwise ordered by the court;
(b) The victim of the sexual assault was under the age of eighteen when the sexual assault was committed;
(c) The defendant was never previously sentenced under this section and has never been convicted of felony sexual assault under section 707-730, 707-731, or 707-732, or incest under section 707-741;
(d) A guardian ad litem appointed in a family court proceeding, or a person assigned by the Children's Advocacy Center to serve as guardian ad litem, agreed that it would be in the best interest of the child for the defendant to be considered for the expedited sentencing program. No prosecuting authority shall issue a statement of no objection without this prior agreement; and
(e) The defendant has complied with the requirements for consideration for the expedited sentencing program as established in subsection (6); provided that at sentencing the prosecuting authority may oppose the defendant's participation in the expedited sentencing program if the prosecuting authority determines that the defendant has failed to satisfy the criteria under subsection (6).
(5) The prosecuting authority and the child's guardian ad litem may consult with any other appropriate agency or individual to assist in a decision whether to provide a written statement of "no objection" prior to the defendant being considered for sentencing under the expedited sentencing program.
(6) Within seven business days of receipt of the written notice stating that the appropriate prosecuting authority has no objection to the defendant being considered for the expedited sentencing program in accordance with this section, unless the prosecuting authority waives compliance with the time limit, the defendant shall:
(a) Continue to make a good faith effort to avoid the necessity of the child being removed from the family home, including but not limited to moving and remaining out of the family home until otherwise ordered by the court;
(b) Admit to commission of the sexual assault to the police department of the county in which the assault took place or other appropriate investigative law enforcement agency;
(c) Provide to the appropriate prosecuting authority a written waiver of indictment and preliminary hearing for any criminal charges arising from the sexual assault; and
(d) Enter a voluntary plea of guilty to the charge or charges alleged upon or following arraignment.
(7) Notwithstanding sections 706-606.5, 706-620, 706-659, 706-660, and 706-660.2, a defendant considered for the expedited sentencing program under this section when sentence is imposed may be sentenced to a term of probation pursuant to section 706-624; provided that if the defendant is sentenced to a term of imprisonment as a condition of probation, the term of imprisonment may allow for the defendant's retention of employment.
(8) The term of probation under this section shall be as follows:
(a) For an offense under section 707-730 or 707-731, twenty years; and
(b) For an offense under section 707-732 or 707-741, ten years.
(9) In addition to the conditions of probation provided under section 706-624, a sentence under this section shall include that the defendant shall:
(a) Participate in court approved, appropriate sex offender assessment and treatment that shall conform to the guidelines developed by the adult probation division of the appropriate circuit court, until clinically discharged; provided that:
(i) The prosecuting authority shall be provided notice and the opportunity for a hearing prior to any authorization for treatment discontinuance by the court or the adult probation division;
(ii) The defendant shall pay for the cost of the assessment and treatment to the extent that the defendant has the ability to do so; and
(iii) A lack of assessment and treatment resources shall result in the defendant not being considered for the expedited sentencing program;
(b) Provide a written waiver of confidentiality for any assessment, treatment, counseling, therapy, or other program ordered as a condition of probation;
(c) Comply with all orders entered in a proceeding pursuant to chapter 587; and
(d) Comply with other condition deemed by the court to be reasonably necessary for the protection of the victim of the sexual assault or the rehabilitation of the defendant.
(10) There shall be a rebuttable presumption in favor of the court imposing a sentence in accordance with this section when a defendant qualifies for the expedited sentencing program, and written notice of "no objection" is issued by the prosecuting authority. The court shall provide written findings of fact setting forth specific reasons justifying imposition of a sentence that is not in accordance with this section.


Incest Statutes Loopholes
Note: Penalties below are not necessarily the minimum penalties. Other provisions in the law might allow probation.

Alabama, Code of Ala. 13A-13-3
Class C felony. Compare to Rape in the first degree (13A-6-61)

Alaska, Alaska Stat. 11.41.50
Class C felony. Compare to Sexual abuse of a minor in the first degree

Delaware, 11 Del C 766
Class A misdemeanor. Compare to Rape (773)

District of Columbia, D.C. Code 22-1901
Imprisonment not more than 12 years. Compare to First degree child sexual abuse (22-3008)

Florida, Fla Stat 826.04
Felony in the third degree. Compare to Lewd and lascivious molestation (Life)

Hawaii, H.R.S. 707-741
Class C felony. Compare to Sexual assault in the first degree (707-730)

Idaho, Idaho Code 18-6602
Imprisonment up to 25 years. Compare to Rape or Lewd conduct with minor

Indiana, Burns Ind Code Ann 35-46-1-3
Class C felony. Compare to Child molesting (IC 35-42-3)

Iowa, Iowa Code 726.2
Class D felony. Compare to Sexual abuse in the second degree (709.3)

Kentucky, K.R.S. 530.020
Class C felony. Compare to Rape in the first degree (510.040)

Louisiana, La R.S. 14:78
Fine, up to 5 years, up to 15 years. Compare to Aggravated rape (RS 14 42)

Maine, 17-A M.R.S. 556
Class D crime. Compare to Gross sexual assault (253(1)(B)

Maryland, Md Criminal Law Code Ann 3-323
Imprisonment of 1-10 years. Compare to Rape.

Massachusetts, ALM GL ch. 272 17
Imprisonment up to 2 ? years. Up to 20 years. Compare to Rape and abuse of child (Chapter 265: Section 23)

Minnesota, Minn. Stat. 609.395 (365)
Imprisonment up to 10 years. Compare to Criminal sexual conduct (609.342)

Missouri, 568.020 R.S.Mo
Class D felony. Compare to Rape or Statutory rape (566.032.1)

Nebraska, R.R.S. Neb. 28-703
Class 3 felony. Compare to Sexual assault, first degree (28-319)

Nevada, NRS 201.180
Imprisonment 2-10 years. Compare to Sexual assault (NRS 200.366)

New Mexico, N.M. Stat. 30-10-3
Third degree felony. Compare to Criminal sexual penetration

North Dakota, N.D. Code 12.1-20-11
Class C felony. Compare to Gross sexual imposition (12.1-20-03)

Ohio, ORC 2907.03
Third degree felony. Compare to Rape (2907.02)

Oklahoma, 21 Okl. St. 885
Imprisonment up to 10 years. Compare to Rape in first degree.

Oregon, ORS 163.525
Class C felony. Compare to Rape in first degree.

Pennsylvania, 8 Pa.C.S. 4302
Second degree felony. Compare to Rape (3121)

South Carolina, S.C. Code 16-15-20
Fine or up to 1 year in jail. Compare to Lewd act upon a child (16-15-140).

South Dakota, S.D. Codified Laws 22-22-19.1
Class 5 felony. Compare to Sexual contact with child under 16 (22-22-7)

Tennessee, Tenn.Code 39-15-302
Class C felony. Compare to Rape of a child (39-13-522.

Texas, Tex. Penal Cod. 25.02
Third degree felony. Compare to Indecency with a child (21.11)

Vermont, 13 V.S.A. 205
Fine or up to 5 years in prison. Compare to Sexual assault (3252).

Virginia, Va. Code 18.2-366 Class 3 felony. Compare to Rape (18.2-61)

Washington, ARCW 9A.64.020
Class B felony. Compare to Rape of a child (RCW 9A.44.073)

West Virginia, W. Va.Code 61-8-12
Imprisonment for 5-15 years. Compare to Sexual abuse in the first degree (61-8B-7)

Wisconsin, Wis. Stat. 944.06
Class C felony. Compare to First degree sexual assault (948.02(1).

Wyoming, Wyo. Stat. 6-4-402
Fine or up to 5 years. Compare to Sexual assault in the second degree

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